Board index Flathead Power-Technical Questions, Answers, and Suggestions Evo's Thru 99 Sportster exhaust...

Sportster exhaust...

Post Fri Aug 07, 2015 12:12 am

Posts: 1786
I've just bought a Sportster 883, 1992 Evo chain-drive, CV carb and 5-speed in a moment of weakness....

So, on first inspection it feels very nice. However it is appallingly loud and from long experience of British bikes and later, 500cc track racing engines making specific power outputs no Sportster will ever approach, I don't believe for a moment that this is necessary.

Generally speaking, my gut feeling is that it would go best all round, on a free-flowing 2 into 1 system around 40" pipe length from the back cylinder. I don't like leg-burners, I did my time on those long ago, so I'm looking at the SuperTrapp stainless 2 into 1 - any thiughts or advice on this?
Shoot, a man could have a good weekend in Dallas with all that stuff...

Post Mon Aug 17, 2015 8:37 pm

Posts: 492
Location: Six miles East of Cheney, Wa.
I believe that a good tuned two-into-one will make the best usable power on a V-Twin Harley. So I totally agree. I would also agree that a 883 Sporter shouldn't be announcing it's self to the world from a mile away, more of a big twin "thing". :)

I think your gut feeling is right on, and you will enjoy the bike more with a good 2-into-1.

ken.

Post Sun Nov 29, 2015 5:21 am

Posts: 1786
Quick update on this bike - it goes very well.

http://i1023.photobucket.com/albums/af3 ... qelfp.jpeg


Just had a tedious morning replacing fork seals, fitting Hagon progressive springs, Ricor Intiminators and stock length tubes and shocks. Absolutely transforms the handling...
Shoot, a man could have a good weekend in Dallas with all that stuff...

Post Sun Nov 29, 2015 12:21 pm

Posts: 645
Location: Wisconsin, USA
That's a good looking sportster. A word of warning, my brother rides a 47UL but has recently purchased a sporty 1200S and now feels the old flat is just too slow. He also has a shovel and a couple of big twin evo's but it's the sporty that ruined him.

Post Sun Nov 29, 2015 12:44 pm
Pa Site Admin

Posts: 6226
Location: Ohio USA

I've always found Sportster models quick and spunky.

Post Mon Nov 30, 2015 9:49 am

Posts: 1786
Eeewwwww.... oh, wait, does that just mean "lively" in US English? Cue double entendre about "spunky sidekicks"...

I've always had a soft spot for Sporties. They aren't expensive and go quite well, in terms of usable street performance. This one has a "sweet spot" around 60-70mph, the handling is quite good now and all round, it's lots of fun. Don't know that I'd use it for long trips, mind.
Shoot, a man could have a good weekend in Dallas with all that stuff...

Post Mon Nov 30, 2015 2:08 pm
Pa Site Admin

Posts: 6226
Location: Ohio USA

Yep...lively, peppy, quick, fast, strong, etc.. :D

Post Mon Nov 30, 2015 3:24 pm

Posts: 1726
Location: Interlaken, NY USA

Nice Sporty!, did that exhaust come up quieter than the earlier duals?
Enjoyed the railway pics as well, another of my interests also. Do other railway systems besides the US use the knuckle couplers instead of Buffers as in the UK/Western Europe? Thought I spied some in a couple of pics.
DL

Post Mon Nov 30, 2015 3:51 pm

Posts: 1786
Railway pics...

Image

Centre couplers of various descriptions are increasingly common in Europe, Scandinavia and the U.K. for various kinds of fixed-rake (=consist) stock. The USSR standardised on an American style centre coupler in the 1930s but it didn't become universal until the late 1950s. Narrow gauge railways generally use the "Norwegian" or "chopper" type on older lines.

The new pipe is hardly quiet but it's a great improvement, more rounded tone and the bobble-bobble on the over-run is a great improvement over the raucous blare with backfires when you eased the throttle, provided by the Screaming Eagle pipes. It has definitely developed a case of "megaphonitis" but it is smoother through the range, if not actually any faster.
Shoot, a man could have a good weekend in Dallas with all that stuff...

Post Mon Nov 30, 2015 4:23 pm
GuS

Posts: 420
Location: Bergen, Norway
Nice bike.
I've been playing with the idea to make my next all year round bike a Sportster. Maybe same yr as yours. Something a bit modern that would not die from the heavy salting of roads during winter.
How is th 5sp compared to the 4?
Did you make that exhaust? Make/model of exhaust?
GuS

Post Tue Dec 01, 2015 12:28 am

Posts: 1786
Exhaust is a custom one, pretty much a copy of the Bossley Reventon unit. A local custom shop (Fenland Choppers) made it. The B-R one was a lot of money.... make sure the oil level is right, though, because drips from the filler cap get smelly very quickly, as do excess fumes from the breather. You'd think I'd have learnt not to have a "leg burner" exhaust by now, but apparently not.

5 speed is definitely an improvement. It's reckoned to be more reliable than the 4 speed. Plus it has the trapdoor back, so you don't have to split the cases if not.....

The bike originally looked rather different

http://i1023.photobucket.com/albums/af3 ... apzcva.jpg

It actually handled pretty well but the ride was back-breaking so I raised it back to stock height (I'm not 100% sure I had the correct front tubes, I think they may be 1" or so too long but they feel about right)

Tell the truth, I'd go for an enduro bike or something similar for riding on salted roads. Half the price or less, lighter and probably already covered in scrapes and dings. Plastics aren't affected by salt, either. That, or a metric twin of some kind. I once had a 250cc MZ which was great, its ISDT heritage really showed through once I got some decent tyres - the alloy/steel joint in the mudguard rusted right through but so what?

I know Southern Norway quite well. Nice place provided the Client is sorting out your local tax, and the shipyard knows you are coming on a Sunday; best avoided otherwise.
Shoot, a man could have a good weekend in Dallas with all that stuff...

Post Tue Dec 01, 2015 8:33 am

Posts: 1726
Location: Interlaken, NY USA

Coming from the era of reverse cone Megga's myself, I can just imagine the sound. I've often wondered if the SuperTrapps, etc are that great of an improvement with their diffusers, etc.

Side note on RR's. Just after WWII 12 GE electric locomotives originally destined for Russia were sold to the Milwaukee line for use on the Milwaukee's electrified division through the Rockies. (When ordered, Russia was our ally, but that changed postwar and US gov't prevented the sale) They had to change the gauge to standard vs the Ruskie's paranoid 5ft gauge,(Russia deliberately ran a different gauge to frustrate invading armies) and were nicknamed "Little Joes" (for Joe Stalin) by the operating crews. Reliable engine, ran them 'till they turned off the juice in 1974.
Another sidenote on Milwaukee's electrical operation in the Rockies, the energy generated from running the downhill trains's motors as generators was used to power trains ascending the slopes. The power was fed back through the overhead lines.
Sorry for the deviation from motorcycles, but just some historical trivia that I found interesting and I thought others might as well.
DL

Post Tue Dec 01, 2015 9:00 am

Posts: 1786
It sounds like a Dunstall Norton Commando :D I did think of having Dunstall replica pipes, Armour's of Bournemouth are still producing them to the original tools but decided on the mega. It suits the bike very well!

Re Super Trapp, I'm not particularly convinced that this sort of bike benefits greatly from fancy-pants "exhaust tuning" - get the length about right, the expansion volume about right, check your plugs and main jets and overall state of tune, and differences are more apparent than real after that, I think. I was pretty unimpressed with the SE units, extremely noisy and the bike ran as rough as a badger's bum at low speeds.

There was a class of 2-10-0 locomotive built for Tsarist Russia that ended up being re-gauged and sold to various US RR after WW1. It tells you quite a lot about UK vs US railway practice that a class of locomotive larger than the biggest non-articulated locomotives built for UK use (the BR Standard 9F 2-10-0) found a role as motive power for minor and branch lines.
Shoot, a man could have a good weekend in Dallas with all that stuff...

Post Tue Dec 01, 2015 2:24 pm
GuS

Posts: 420
Location: Bergen, Norway
Cannot disagree on the lightweight Enduro approach.... but my daily ride is a 1961 /2 Beemer. Kids are slowly growing out of the sidecar, and about time to take off the old Watsonian and go back to 2WD.
The bike handle the salt well, but several yearly tear down and cleaning of wheel bearing and brakes is mandatory, and the bike doesent exactly gloss.
So i thought of changing the old warrior by something a bit more modern like a 2nd hand 10-15 yr old Sportster. Thinking along your line in terms of how the riding position should be. Maybe even lift the suspension a bit more. An upright position is better on slipprey roads.
To the tyres, I've tried various types including steel spikes. Right now, im on a pair of 3,5x18 Heidenau. Really soft rubber that got good traction on snow and ice. Not so good as with spikes, but I get by.
Cant help you with the local taxes, but if you happen to have a landfall in Bergen sometime give me a call and I may offer you a cup of coffe or even a local beer.

GuS

Post Tue Dec 01, 2015 3:25 pm

Posts: 1786
I rode a 1974 R60/6 BMW for some years, in all weathers including snow, sometimes commuting up to 40 miles. Very sure-footed bike, once you get the hang of it.

I'd feel the Sportster was both too heavy, and too top-heavy for this kind of use. If you can't pick the bike up you WILL have serious problems sooner or later.

Plus, with a metric cruiser or enduro, drop it and damage it and you can just shrug your shoulders, collect the insurance (if it's worth insuring at all) and buy another one at the weekend..
Shoot, a man could have a good weekend in Dallas with all that stuff...

Post Tue Dec 01, 2015 4:37 pm

Posts: 1726
Location: Interlaken, NY USA

My Winter ride, back in the day when I still played that game was a '44 M20. Reliable starter, and didn't have enough power to spin the rear wheel even on ice! Proudest moment? When it started first kick at -40 deg one morning. We'd taken the bikes to a friend's cabin in the Adirondacks for a weekend, ran from bar to bar on the snow packed roads. The sled riders thought we were deranged. Think they were probably right!
DL
I still have the M20, it's the bike that got me started on Flatheads.


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