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Strangle Hold.

Use this forum for general conversation amongst yourselves when you don't have anything better to do. We like gossip! Try to keep the technical out of it.
Post Sun Dec 13, 2015 1:06 pm

Posts: 497
Location: Six miles East of Cheney, Wa.
Well winter has a strangle hold on us here....garage is just too cold to experiment with starting. Even when I have a fire going for hours, anything metal is mighty cold still. Let alone, the possibility of a ride. Sometimes I'll give the Little Mistress a kick or two, but the oil is really thick. !!! Do usually get a pop and a bang with the ignition advanced. I suppose I could take the Beemer out for a ride if I put on about ten layers of clothes.

So I've turned my attention to my arsenal, sighting some of my military bolt guns to shoot hunting loads, should I wish to take one hunting. (usually hunt with a flintlock Jeager, 1861 Springfield rifle, or a Brown Bess carbine).

So far I've set up/sighted in a No.4 SMLE Longbranch sporter with a 130 grain bullet for Cougar, (don't like sproterized military rifles, but got this for $50.00 and it is a nice piece of iron) a box-stock No.4 SMLE (also a Longbranch) with a 180 grain bear/deer/moose/elk load, and I'm working on some 220 grain bullets and loads for my Long-Tom Persian Mauser. Also set my Remington 03A3 up with a 180 grain load. Already had a higher front sight on it for the Appleseed shoots, so that was easy, and know where to re-set the sights for a 200 yard zero with the ball load. I did take that (the 03A3) hunting on the last day of Bear season. Now only Cougar is open, and I just got a really cool remote controlled electronic game call, and a rabbit decoy that shakes and wiggles and jiggles.

Also refinished my replica/bogus No.4(T)SMLE, (Longbranch) as I did have it cammo'd with green and black paint for maximum concealment. !!! Looks much better in stained and oiled wood. That was a big job though. Believe it or don't, I do get a 1/2" group out of it once in a while.

Well I know some of you are gun-cranks, so maybe you'll relate to that.

Hope many of you can still ride this time of year.

ken.

Post Sun Dec 13, 2015 2:09 pm
Pa Site Admin

Posts: 6037
Location: Ohio USA

Cougar ? Ya need to pick up a Winchester 94 Bro. 30-30 is perfect for varmints all the way up to white tail deer. I'd be hesitant on using it on bear though. You may just piss him off. :lol: When you choose the 94, get an early one with the metal butt plate. The ones with the plastic butt plate have been cheapened in many other areas. Keep it open sights.

Post Sun Dec 13, 2015 6:05 pm

Posts: 497
Location: Six miles East of Cheney, Wa.
Well I'm here to tell ya, I am a 94 fan, and have two. One is a pre-64 that belonged to my wife's uncle, the story is that he shot well over 30 deer with it. (in the backwoods of Idaho) It's quite accurate.

Then I have another that I picked up in Missouri, which I made into a half-magazine rifle/carbine. It's the next to the lightest rifle I own, and I do take it out on bear on occasion...but I carry a pistol that will pack a punch when I do. It has a Williams peep on it, with a fiber optic bead front sight, and it gets on target like....yesterday! Fast and light, I love it. Only holds three shots, but being used to single shots, that's, for me, a lot of fire power.

If that don't convince you that I'm a great .30WCF fan, I also have a Savage single shot in .30-30/.30WCF, with a 26" barrel, and a Savage 24V, .30WCF barrel over 20gauge. !!! Last but not least, I have a Savage 99, made in 1914, in .30-30.

And I'm with you on the open sights. Much prefer them to a scope. I'm well schooled with them, and most hunting North of Spokane is in the thick stuff. I only have three scoped rifles, and rarely use them. The Savage 99, a .350 RemMag, and the Bogus/Replica No.4(T) SMLE.

k.

Post Sun Dec 13, 2015 6:55 pm
Pa Site Admin

Posts: 6037
Location: Ohio USA

I am stunned Bro. You and I know our firearm preferences well. One of the 30-30's I owned was also a Savage. It was a bolt action 4 shot clip fed rifle. I took a ten point white tail with it when I was in 11th grade, while skipping school. I am also a one shot person because of my Father. He said ...Son...if you can't bring it down with one shot, you should never have taken that shot. Though I've owned and toyed with hundreds of military assault rifles, from all variants of AK-47's, SKS's, etc., in calibers such as 7.62x39, 7.62x54, 30-06, 303, 308, 7.5mm Jap, 8mm Mauser, 50 BMG etc., the medium caliber 30-30 ended up being my preference of all around choice for game. I never did care for the .223. Peep sights are great though on any large caliber rifle round, including the monster 50 BMG. All my bucks were taken with single shot rifles. Most of my small game were taken with single shot rifle and shotguns.

Post Sun Dec 13, 2015 8:40 pm

Posts: 250
Location: Orlando
It was 83 degrees and dry with a couple puffy white clouds in the bright blue sky all weekend. Same last weekend when I took scooter to the range with my rifle strapped to the back and the pistols in the bags. boarder line legal. Experimenting with co-witnessing my AK, dialing in my M1 carbine, and trying out my wife's new Glock.

Not many places close to shoot outside unless someones breaking into my trailer.
I hope it warms up for you.

Brendan

Post Mon Dec 14, 2015 8:13 pm

Posts: 497
Location: Six miles East of Cheney, Wa.
Man Brendan, yer killing me! Eighty degrees...wow! M1 Carbine...always wanted one, probably one of the few WWII rifles/carbines that I don't have. Anyhow, it's only going to get colder until the middle of February, when the weather should break for the better.

Yes I have also drilled hard and worked to become expert with my AK, SKS, M1 Garand, M16 etc., for defensive purposes when the end of the world comes, :roll: but really, sitting under a tree when out hunting, and admiring a nice flintlock, or 94, or pre-1950's military rifle is really where my heart is at. Indeed the .223/5.56 isn't good for much except combat, and many argue that it's not much good for that either. But that....is another story! But I wouldn't feel exactly naked with my Viet Nam era Colt A1 in hand either. But having said that, I would probably grab the AK74 first, if push came to shove.

Have probably killed most of my game with the 7.7, .303, and a little .44 Mag Carbine that I have. But, my .61 Flintlock Jeager has been catching up over the years. For some reason, when I have a 94 in hand, nothing pops up to get shot, so I've never actually killed anything with the .30WCF. First deer was with a No.4 SMLE, first buck with the .44 carbine. Then a bunch with the 7.7 Jap. I also had a Savage bolt gun in .30-30, but foolishly traded it off.

k.

Post Tue Dec 15, 2015 9:09 am
Pa Site Admin

Posts: 6037
Location: Ohio USA

I had an M-1 carbine years back. For a small.30 caliber round, it packed quite a punch. I could empty the clip is a few seconds when playing around. It would be neat to own an M-2 carbine but one must possess a class 3 license to own one since the M-2 has select fire for both semi and full auto capabilities. I picked up a modern auto loading hand gun in the same round to mate with it. Sold that as well. The largest handgun I still keep around is a 454 Casual Raging Bull. The muzzle is ported to lesson the kick and it really does lesson the kick. The 454 has high power rifle ballistics and no vest will stop it. My favorite handguns are cap and ball revolvers. Mine are all replicas but accurate for fixed sights. All are .44's. I have the Navy Colt, Army Colt, and the Colt Walker. The Walker is the ass kicker with ballistics reaching beyond .357 magnum. They are dirty to work with though. I have a replica Flintlock Pennsylvania Long Rifle in 50 cal. but have never fired it. I used to shoot cap and ball 50 cal. out of Hawkins Plains rifle. I took one 9 point buck with that one. I took it elk hunting but did not see any elk. I played with a lot of SKS's converting them to 30 round banana clip feed and 100 round drum feed plus converted several over to folding stocks. They shoot best in original form though. All my SKS's were Russian made. My AK's were made all over but the Russian one was the better made one with a milled receiver. The other variants had stamped receivers. I had to destroy one SKS I owned because it went south on me while a the shooting range. I was cracking off individual rounds at the target with a 30 round banana clip in it, when after 4 or 5 spent rounds it suddenly went full auto and emptied the clip before it was silenced. I tore the rifle down to investigate what had happened. Turns out the sear and stop wore to where they no longer held the firing pin back. One thing nice about breaking down an SKS is you can do it with the nose of a single ball round.

Post Tue Dec 15, 2015 8:20 pm

Posts: 497
Location: Six miles East of Cheney, Wa.
Man, Pa, we must be twin brothers....almost.

I love BP revolvers, but my favorite by far has become a Uberti .36 Navy Remington that I got from a guy, NIB, who knew, and got it from Uberti's daughter when she was the sales rep in the U.S. It's a grouse slayer supreme and great for finishing off big game that's not quite completely dead. That's usually my hunting sidearm, but I like to take all the pistolas out once in a while. The M95 Nagant revolver is a good little woods gun too, and mine is really accurate.

Also have a Lyman Great Plains single shot in .50 caliber that I really like, dead-nutz accurate, and with 70 grains behind the ball I believe it also leaves the .357 in the dust. (and kicks like a mule) May take that as my sidearm when trying to call in Mr.Cougar, which I hope to do over Christmas vacation. (working for a school district has it's perks!)

I had a Blackhawk in .30 Carbine, and really liked it, but traded it off as it was quite heavy for the power it produced (which isn't bad) and with light loads didn't kill small game any better than the .36 Navy, Nagant, or .38, .357, .44spl or .44Mag with shot loads, but probably weighed more or as much than my heaviest .44Mag. But I did get a lot of use out of it, and enjoyed it a lot.

Picked up a Uberti "El Patron" stainless in .45 Colt this summer, 5.5" barrel, really love that pistola. I shoot 42 grains of Swiss fffg under a 256 grain bullet. That's a fun-gun. !!! Nice and light too, so it'll be getting some woods time. Already took it on a long back pack in August. I've thought about getting something in .454 or .480, but I think my .44mags kick enough with heavy bullets. One of my .44 Mags I've had since 1972. It's killed deer and a lot of coyotes. I think I've put over 6,000 rounds through it, mostly .44 Special.

The SKS, is, indeed, best served in original form. I've always thought that the ten round stripper clip feeding enabled one to carry far more ammo, than one can with magazines, should one want or need to carry a maximum ammo load. My SKS is also Russian, one of the very first imports to hit the U.S., many moons ago. I believe it was an un-issued specimen. Of course, then I issued it to myself, and shot it a lot. Does great at 500 yards/meters. My AK is Romanian, (74) and I've probably put more rounds through it than any other rifle I own. It has never jammed or failed to feed. Came close to shooting Rifleman with it at an Appleseed shoot. I did have to remove the wood it came with, which looked like it had been/sanded/shaped made by drunk monkeys, and replace it with a Russian stock set which has the red tint/color to it. Now she looks as good as she shoots. I've also trained with it the most, and can field strip and reassemble while blind folded. Just in case someone pokes my eyes out after the end of the world. :wink:

Great to hear such similar views/experiences when it comes to firearms. Guess I'd better find something to do to the bike.

ken.

Post Tue Dec 15, 2015 9:18 pm
Pa Site Admin

Posts: 6037
Location: Ohio USA

I'll take a quick pic of a pile of firearms I have on hand that are not taken care of as the others. Mind you...it is just a pile of everything's. I used to purchase at least two per month and continued that addiction for decades. I never had any SKS, AK or variant AK jam or misfire. I had only a few AR's and they all jammed at least a few times. The BP revolvers were skill work for me and my buddies. We practiced hip shooting on the draw. I even got proficient enough to fan the hammer of the Colts and empty it very quickly with good accuracy. Drawing was done on tin cans. I've owned some of the most accurate rifles, both high power and small caliber but one rifle I own I have never missed with yet. It is a 22 short, long, and long rifle, bolt action tubular fed Springfield from the very early 1900's. I inherited it from my Great Grandfather. Open sights only but fully adjustable at the rear sight. I adjusted it when I was around 10 years old at 100 feet and to this day it will hit as easy at 100 yards as it does at 10 feet using long rifle cartridges. Using shorts are only good up to around 100 feet and you could smoke a cigarette waiting on the shorts bullet to get to its target. Using the long rifle you had time to chamber another round before the bullet got to the target. Sure a big difference in small caliber and large high powered rifle calibers. With the high powered rifle calibers, the bullet struck the target before the ears heard the boom. An old school friend of mine and I decided to do a simple bullet speed test using a 22 long rifle cartridge against a British 303. The shooting range would be a railroad bridge over a very large Pennsylvania river. From the railroad bridge, which sat above the river by a good 1000 feet, and the straight stretch of river from the bridge was over two miles, I aimed the 22 long rifle up at a 15 degree angle and let the round fly. I could have cooked a steak by the time that little 22 round hit the water of the river. We could see the small rooster tail of water when the round made contact with the river. Bullet did make it a good mile before gravity won out over it. On the other hand when I let loose the British 303 round, I did not raise the rifle in a 15 degree angle. I pointed it directly straight at the impact area the 22 round hit. I let the 303 round fly and instantly a huge 20 to 30 foot high rooster tail of water appeared in the river. Then I heard the report of the rifle cracking.

Post Wed Dec 16, 2015 12:18 pm
Pa Site Admin

Posts: 6037
Location: Ohio USA

These are the forgotten ones of several years. The pile is three layers deep between sheets and blankets. The Sons and I will sort through them next summer.

Image

Post Wed Dec 23, 2015 12:51 pm

Posts: 497
Location: Six miles East of Cheney, Wa.
My friends and I had the same experience when we got old enough to graduate from our .22's to center fire rifles. My first was a 7X57mm, and I would aim a long ways away, hold way over, and the bullet would strike.....way over!

Following pips are my Brown Bess carbine, which I did some shooting with yesterday, and my .62 Jeager. One where I had shot a deer, and was emptying the rifle after I got it back to camp. The one with the Jeager and the paper plate was when I had left it loaded after hunting season, for almost a whole year, until next season. Aimed for the center of the little plate at 100 yards. The rifle was never re-loaded during the entire previous hunting season. Clean and load them properly, the flintlock is totally reliable, and won't "absorb moisture from the air". !!! As I'm sure you know.

When I first built my AR, Vietnam era Colt with a BCM barrel, it failed to go into battery once in a while, over the first 500 rounds. So it did have to wear in a bit. But again, my AK, never a hiccup from the time I took it out of the box, and I've put a lot of rounds through it.

k.
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Post Wed Dec 23, 2015 4:40 pm

Posts: 1189
Location: Ojo Caliente,NM,USA
Looks like the direct ancestor of this 73 Springfield.
Image
Dusty

Post Wed Dec 23, 2015 5:05 pm
Pa Site Admin

Posts: 6037
Location: Ohio USA

My Brown Bess was 69 caliber and smooth bore. I sold it to a friend.

Post Wed Dec 23, 2015 10:58 pm

Posts: 497
Location: Six miles East of Cheney, Wa.
No way! I have two Trapdoors, a rifle made in 1884, and a rifle made into a carbine, but done way back in the day, that's from 1876 I believe. I've hunted with both, but have never got to shoot at anything. I load mine exclusively with black powder, 72 grains under a 415 grain bullet for the carbine, and I can get 80 grains under the Speer 400 grain jacketed bullet for the rifle.

Sell Brown Bessie? How could you??!!! Almost took a shot at a bear with mine, but it was about ten yards or so out of my sure-hit range, so I let it go. If I could have taken a rest I might have tried. Was in tall grass, so I couldn't get into a kneeling or sitting position either.

k.
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Post Wed Dec 23, 2015 11:22 pm

Posts: 1189
Location: Ojo Caliente,NM,USA
My Dad traded a Cushman for that one and some cash in 1955. The kid he got it from had just inherited it from his grandpa who smuggled it back from Cuba (where it was a camp cooks gun) in a locker, so that Teddy wouldn't ever find out that he let it fall in a campfire. The kid said that grandpa was certain that Teddy would have him shot for falling asleep. It explodes crows nicely but never shot much else. It actually shoots better than my 95 Marlin in 45/70.
Dusty

Post Thu Dec 24, 2015 10:07 am

Posts: 497
Location: Six miles East of Cheney, Wa.
That's interesting. My Trapdoor Rifle has a serious burn on the buttstock, near the toe, with an ancient repair done to it. I regret selling my Marlin 95, it was very accurate. I'm thinking about trying to buy it back. My carbine seems to be more accurate than my rifle, although the rifle is not inaccurate.

k.

Post Thu Dec 24, 2015 12:19 pm

Posts: 1189
Location: Ojo Caliente,NM,USA
I don't know if it's still there but there was a trapdoor carbine in the Canyon Texas museum that ended a local Indian war by killing the Chief at a little over a quarter mile. It was on loan from the family when I saw it 40 years ago so may be gone by now. That was one of the best museums I ever say 90% of the fire arms had detailed local history.
Dusty

Post Thu Dec 24, 2015 12:22 pm
Pa Site Admin

Posts: 6037
Location: Ohio USA

I sacrificed the Brown Bess for a Pennsylvania 50 caliber flintlock long rifle. That rifle is said to be a two hundred yard accurate rifle. I still have it but have never fired it.

Post Thu Dec 24, 2015 1:27 pm

Posts: 497
Location: Six miles East of Cheney, Wa.
Oh that is funny. I sacrificed a Krag Carbine (not original, a Bubba job) a Ruger Blackhawk in .30 Carbine, and another in .44 Mag in order to obtain the Bess. !!!

Dude, you've got to shoot that rifle. Flintlocks Forever! Flintlocks and Flatheads!!!

My Uberti .357, (blued) and Uberti "El Patron" .45 Colt below.

ken.
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Post Sun Dec 27, 2015 8:31 pm

Posts: 2717
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Pa wrote:
Cougar ? Ya need to pick up a Winchester 94 Bro. 30-30 is perfect for varmints all the way up to white tail deer. I'd be hesitant on using it on bear though. You may just piss him off. :lol: When you choose the 94, get an early one with the metal butt plate. The ones with the plastic butt plate have been cheapened in many other areas. Keep it open sights.



They also make a Model 94 in 44 Magnum for the bear.

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