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32E Generator Shunt Coil Identification Help Needed

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Pa Site Admin

Posts: 5954
Location: Ohio USA

See Photo...Which field coil is the Shunt field coil ? End cover [left] with brush holders is placed as it would be installed onto frame [right]. Orange and white paint marks, which service manual notes for identifying field coils, are missing so I cannot use the paint marks to identify the field coils. Note the wires of the field coils. The field coil wires nearest the generator identification tag are spread apart. The opposite field coil wires exit the field coil windings close together. Does the difference between where the field coil wires exit the field coil windings identify whether the field coil is a Shunt or a Regulating field coil ? Thanks, Pa

P.S. If you click on the photo, it will enlarge.
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Posts: 202
Location: Middle England UK
The Shunt (white) coil is farthest away from the terminal posts,with the wires close together.
All the aftermarket coils I've seen have the wires apart on both coils,you have to bind the shunt wires together to stop them fouling.


Posts: 28
Hi, Can you tell me Limey-Dave how to identify old aftermarket shunt and regulating coils ? I have two coils without paint marks with the wires at either side, the only difference that I can see is that one coil has small single strand wire and the other has thicker multi-strand wires.
Thank you.

Pa Site Admin

Posts: 5954
Location: Ohio USA

I recently found some information on determining which coil is which. It was in theTM9-1879 Ordnance Maintenance manual of 1944. The visual paint markings of red or orange on the field coil or regulating coil, and the white marking on the shunt coil still apply. The ampere numbers below will identify the coils if those paint marking are missing, as long as the coils are good. If one is good you will at least know which coil is good and which coil is bad. The information really helps if the coils are not attached to the generator body. This applies to the 32E 6-volt 3 brush generators. Not sure if the info is good for 2 brush ones.

Under “Test Regulating Field Coil”

Use a fully charged 6-volt battery, an accurate ammeter (3-ampere scale preferably) and a pair of test prods. This is a current draw test and results will depend upon condition of the battery and accuracy of the ammeter.
a) “Test For Open Or Internal Short” With tester, battery and test prods correctly connected, touch the coil and terminals of the coil. Tester should resist 1.4 to 1.9 amperes. If no tester reading is recorded, field coil is open. If tester reading exceeds 2.2 amperes, the coil is shorted. Replace the coil

c) “Test Shunt Field Coil” Follow same procedure outlined in (2) (a) above. A higher resistance winding is used in the shunt coil and the normal current reading will be less. A normal coil will draw from 0.6 to 1.0 ampere. If tester reading exceeds 1.5 amperes, it is shorted within and must be replaced.


Posts: 28
WOW ! Thank you Soooo much Pa ! I will eagerly set about the tests ASAP ! The readings should not only tel me which coil is which and if they are any good, but also if they are the correct coils or not, because it's an unknown generator that I acquired with a basket case and the coils had been linked with the third brush removed. I have just got a new relay delivered, so rather than getting a regulator, I wanted to run it with the third brush ( That I happened to have ) And the new relay. I love being able to understand a problem, rather than just bolting new bits on ! And you have helped me do just that.
Thanks again, Ivor.
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Pa Site Admin

Posts: 5954
Location: Ohio USA

Glad I was able to help you Ivor.


Posts: 360
You can just use a multimeter, set it to OHM reading ( resistance) There will be a low Ohm and High Ohm field. The high Ohm is your "lights are on" field
edit: incidently, if OHm is 0, field is broken, if ohm is endless, also broken


Posts: 1125
Location: Ojo Caliente,NM,USA
If I haven't lost all my math skills or misremembered the magic circle PA's tests would convert to 3.158 ohms - 4.286 ohms for the main field coil. And 6 ohms to 10 ohms for the shunt.
Dusty


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