Board index Flathead Power-Technical Questions, Answers, and Suggestions 45 Flatties Baffles in 45 motors

Baffles in 45 motors

Post Mon May 29, 2017 12:35 pm

Posts: 1729
Having now started and run this motor, it does not appear to smoke or over-oil, and that's with no baffles, Hastings rings and piston skirt oilers. Piston clearances set to 0.004"
Shoot, a man could have a good weekend in Dallas with all that stuff...

Post Tue May 30, 2017 11:46 am

Posts: 374
I was always thoughyt that the baffles should be in to get more oil in there! Just drive her in carfully and you should be fine!

Post Tue May 30, 2017 3:48 pm

Posts: 1729
Bike has piston skirt oilers fitted, so I'm not concerned about missing the baffles.

Otherwise they are probably useful, although I'm less convinced with modern lubricating oils.
Shoot, a man could have a good weekend in Dallas with all that stuff...

Post Tue May 30, 2017 4:03 pm

Posts: 3296
Location: Central Illinois, USA
It always confused me Folks,...

But Indian sources typically claimed baffles added oil to the front cylinder,
whereas H-D sources typically claimed they shielded oil from the front cylinder.

Conversely, Indians had a poor scavenging mechanism to remove oil from the cases, whereas H-D's was great.
One note is that H-D removed the baffles from OHVs when they reversed the rods, which then threw more oil at the front.

Its enough to make your forehead wrinkle.

45Brit!

At .004" skirt clearance, I would expect at least a little poop out the exhaust.

....Coten

Post Wed May 31, 2017 12:00 am

Posts: 1729
Piiston clearances are set for T&O pistons and Hastings 3-piece rings. I was advised from various sources that this would be required.

From past experience of British bikes with no baffles, particularly flatheads like the 16H and M20, I don't foresee any problems. The bike does have positive piston skirt oilers, after all

IMG_3630.JPG



I haven't yet run the bike for any great length of time, or at any great revs. I'll report back when I've had the chance to do that.
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Shoot, a man could have a good weekend in Dallas with all that stuff...

Post Tue Aug 22, 2017 5:57 am

Posts: 1729
I can only say the MoCo dropped the baffles once they worked out piston skirt oilers.

Pumping losses, I don't know. One job on the to-do list is a front breather over the place where the generator would usually go.
Shoot, a man could have a good weekend in Dallas with all that stuff...

Post Tue Aug 22, 2017 10:21 am

Posts: 5
I keep making that SAME MISTAKE: assuming that anyone is interested in anything besides their own voice.
Last edited by kitabel on Wed Aug 23, 2017 6:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Post Wed Aug 23, 2017 2:20 pm

Posts: 158
Location: Carver, MN

Great points kitabel!

Post Wed Aug 23, 2017 3:12 pm

Posts: 1729
The MoCo developed the WL into probably, the most highly developed flathead engine anywhere, especially when you consider the number of features which would carry through into the K series and subsequently, the XL and XR series. They were produced in very large numbers, and would be very durable and reliable in service

But, that isn't what we are talking about here. Pumping losses are irrelevant in a 750cc engine producing 23 bhp, with rotating masses that size. They just aren't important. The lubrication clearly works.

But, the racing guys take the baffles out, and don't seize, especially if they have piston skirt oilers.

I need to put some running time on this motor, and report back...
Shoot, a man could have a good weekend in Dallas with all that stuff...

Post Thu Aug 24, 2017 5:41 pm

Posts: 1687
Location: Interlaken, NY USA

Just reworked the breather on my 88" BTSV.
Cut the slinger on the generator gear so that all the outer flange and "holes" were cut off, and all that remained was the inner flange of the slinger. Looks slightly like the Sporty flat washer. The sliding Brass collar was already gone from the cam cover, so that whole path was opened up.
I then made a new breather tower to bolt into the cam cover out of 1/2" conduit, with a custom made plate, and then routed the breather with more conduit to a point past the rear of the engine, roughly in the area where shovels are often vented.
I already have relatively good breather timing with the wider opening in the '72 style sporty breather tower. It seems to be working well, and it doesn't breather right onto the exhaust pipe any longer, keeping that area cleaner. Not really a problem on 45's I know.
DD

Post Thu Aug 24, 2017 11:00 pm

Posts: 1729
My stroked 45 engine has the z-shaped breather (as described in the Victory book). That was modified from a stock part, but I notice that a Dutch supplier is now providing them to order. That's one of the things I would have done differently if I were starting the project now.
Shoot, a man could have a good weekend in Dallas with all that stuff...

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